Can Sleeping In Separate Rooms Save Your Relationship?

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Sleep-divorcing is on the rise with couples realising that having a good night’s sleep is more important than sharing a bed with their partner.

What is sleep-divorcing?

Sleep-divorcing is when a couple decides to sleep in separate beds or rooms to avoid very common sleep disturbances such as snoring, sleep-talking or restlessness.

While sleeping in completely different rooms may seem dramatic, it is important to keep in mind that being well-rested is the key to maintaining overall health.

Topless girl sleeping face down in bed.
Sleep-divorcing is on the rise with couples realising that having a good night’s sleep is more important than sharing a bed with their partner.

When deprived of the recommended 7-9 hours of sleep a night, there lies risk of both short-term and long-term health issues.

According to Healthline, short term effects include irritability, stress, impaired judgement and drowsiness the next day whilst long-term effects could develop into weakened immunity, memory loss, weight gain, low sex drive and risk of diabetes or heart disease.

Having quality shuteye not only reduces the chance of developing health issues but could in fact strengthen the relationship.  

A 2016 study discovered that sleep problems and relationships problems work hand in hand.

Jennifer Adams, author of Sleeping Apart Not Falling Apart told Good Housekeeping that, “feelings of resentment that build from lying awake each or most nights are destructive for a relationship and dealing with those feelings of resentment when sleep-deprived isn’t recommended either”. 

And so filing for a sleep-divorce with your bed buddy could actually be the best solution.

Although the weight of the term sleep-divorce, sounds heavy, it really isn’t.

Plenty of couples around the world function better because of it.

Even Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip have been rumoured to have adopted this sleeping arrangement for years.

Queen Elizabeth II waving in purple outfit.
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip have been rumoured to have adopted the ‘sleep-divorcing’ arrangement for years.

Closer to home, a 2019 study found that over 200 000 Australian couples are opting out of the duvet-stealing, limb-tangled dance that is sleeping in the same bed.

Instead, they are finding that sleeping separately has indeed helped them to maintain a healthy marriage.

For example, in situations where one partner hits the hay early while the other stays up late watching tv, sleep-divorcing works perfectly to ensure everyone’s needs are met.  

RELATED: 11 Tips For A Better Night’s Sleep

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Anisha Premawardhana

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